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Low Cost, Discount Cheap Lumbar, Thoracic or Cervical Spine MRI starting at $290

 

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"Best Value" State Price List Updated 3-28-2014
Prices & Locations Change Daily
Please contact us (888) 550-8895 for a free quote!

Thousands of locations available. The lowest costs by state are listed below.
Prices may change, higher or lower, without notice. Prices vary by location and facility.
New facilities added daily. All prices are all inclusive.  There are no additional charges.
Prices include, our fee, the radiologist reading and a copy of CD.
Abdomen & Pelvis CT's are one price nationwide.

To schedule an MRI or CT Scan, you MUST have a doctor referral!

  • Alabama MRI's starting at $380 . Alabama CT Scans starting at $270

  • Arizona MRI's starting at $290 . Arizona CT Scans starting at $190

  • Arkansas MRI's starting at $510 . Arkansas CT Scans starting at $250

  • California MRI's starting at $325 . California CT Scans starting at $190

  • Colorado MRI's starting at $510. Colorado CT Scans starting at $350
     

  • Connecticut MRI's starting at $830 . Connecticut CT Scans $545

  • Delaware MRI's starting at $755 . Delaware CT Scans starting at $420

Consider traveling to save money...
NY City MRI's  $360 CT Scans $270

  • District of Columbia MRI's starting at $555 . District of Columbia CT Scans at $360

  • Florida MRI's starting at $295 . Florida CT Scans starting at $190

  • Georgia MRI's starting at $380 . Georgia CT Scans starting at $270

  • Illinois MRI's starting at $380 . Illinois CT Scans starting at $270

  • Indiana MRI's starting at $460 . Indiana CT Scans starting at $270
     

  • Iowa MRI's starting at $830 . Iowa CT Scans starting at $645

  • Idaho MRI's starting at $1,030 . Idaho CT Scans starting at $495

Consider traveling to save money...
Las Vegas, Phoenix, Los Angeles, Seattle, Chicago, Atlanta

  • Kansas MRI's starting at $830 . Kansas CT Scans starting at $445

  • Kentucky MRI's starting at $435 . Kentucky CT Scans starting at $300

  • Louisiana MRI's starting at $430 . Louisiana CT Scans starting at $470

  • Maryland MRI starting at $380 . Maryland CT Scan $270

  • Massachusetts MRI's starting at $580 . Massachusetts CT Scans starting at $360

  • Michigan MRI's starting at $560 . Michigan CT Scans starting at $300

  • Minnesota MRI's starting at $905 . Minnesota CT Scans starting at $570

  • Mississippi MRI's starting at $710 . Mississippi CT Scans stting $440

  • Missouri MRI's starting at $380 . Missouri CT Scans starting at $350

  • Montana MRI's starting at $955 . Montana CT Scans starting at $535

  • Nebraska MRI's starting at $460 . Nebraska CT Scans starting at $270

  • Nevada MRI's starting at $380 . Nevada CT Scans starting at $270

  • New Jersey MRI's starting at $380 . New Jersey CT Scans starting at $270

  • New Mexico MRI's starting at $830 . New Mexico CT Scans starting at $470

  • New York MRI's starting at $360 . New York CT Scans starting at $270

  • North Carolina MRI's starting at $830 . North Carolina CT Scans starting at $460

  • North Dakota MRI's starting at $710 . North Dakota CT Scans not available

  • Ohio MRI's starting at $380 . Ohio CT Scans starting at $270

  • Oklahoma MRI's starting at $410 . Oklahoma CT Scans starting at $270

  • Oregon MRI's starting at $600 . Oregon CT Scans starting at $470

  • Pennsylvania MRI's starting at $410 . Pennsylvania CT Scans starting at $300

  • Rhode Island MRI's starting at $680 . Rhode Island CT Scans starting at $420

  • South Carolina MRI's starting at $730 . South Carolina CT Scans starting at $360

Consider traveling to save money...
Florida, New York City, Philadelphia, Atlanta

  • Tennessee MRI's starting at $655. Tennessee CT Scans starting at $520

  • Texas MRI's starting at $380 . Texas CT Scans starting at $270

  • Utah MRI's starting at $730 . Utah CT Scans starting $440

  • Virginia MRI's starting at $780 . Virginia CT Scans starting at $495

  • Washington MRI's starting at $450 . Washington CT Scans starting at $420

  • Wisconsin MRI's starting at $820 . Wisconsin CT Scans starting at $480

What is an MRI of the Spine?

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. MR imaging uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, printed or copied to CD. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays).

Detailed MR images allow physicians to better evaluate various parts of the body and certain diseases that may not be assessed adequately with other imaging methods such as x-ray, ultrasound or computed tomography (also called CT or CAT scanning). An MRI of the spine shows the anatomy of the vertebrae that make up the spine, as well as the disks, spinal cord and the spaces between the vertebrae through which nerves pass. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test of the spine in routine clinical practice.

What are some common uses of the spine MRI procedure?


MR imaging is performed for the following reasons:

  • assess the spinal anatomy.
  • visualize anatomical variations and diseased tissue in the spine.
  • help plan surgeries on the spine such as decompression of a pinched nerve or spine fusion.
  • monitor changes in the spine after an operation, such as scarring or infection.
  • guide the injection of steroids to relieve spinal pain.
  • assess the disks - bulging, degenerated or herniated intervertebral disk—a frequent cause of severe lower back pain and sciatica.
  • evaluate compressed (or pinched) and inflamed nerves.
  • explore possible causes in patients with back pain (compression fracture for example).
  • image spinal infection or tumors that arise in, or have spread to, the spine.
  • assess children with daytime wetting and an inability to fully empty the bladder.

How does the procedure work?

Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not depend on ionizing radiation. Instead, while in the magnet, radio waves redirect the axes of spinning protons, which are the nuclei of hydrogen atoms, in a strong magnetic field.  The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other coils, located in the machine and in some cases, placed around the part of the body being imaged, send and receive radio waves, producing signals that are detected by the coils.  A computer then processes the signals and generates a series of images each of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by the interpreting physician. Overall, the differentiation of abnormal (diseased) tissue from normal tissues is often better with MRI than with other imaging modalities such as x-ray, CT and ultrasound 

How is the procedure performed?

MRI examinations may be performed on outpatients or inpatients.  You will be positioned on the moveable examination table. Straps and bolsters may be used to help you stay still and maintain the correct position during imaging.  Small devices that contain coils capable of sending and receiving radio waves may be placed around or adjacent to the area of the body being studied.  Depending on the location of symptoms, only part of the spine may be imaged. For example, the cervical (neck) portion, the thoracic (chest) spine or the lumbar (lower) spine.

If a contrast material will be used in the MRI exam, a nurse or technologist will insert an intravenous (IV) line into a vein in your hand or arm. A saline solution may be used. The solution will drip through the IV to prevent blockage of the IV line until the contrast material is injected.  You will be moved into the magnet of the MRI unit and the radiologist and technologist will leave the room while the MRI examination is performed.  When the examination is completed, you may be asked to wait until the technologist or radiologist checks the images in case additional images are needed.

Your intravenous line will be removed.  MRI exams generally include multiple runs (sequences), some of which may last several minutes.  The entire examination is usually completed within 40 minutes. MR spectroscopy, which provides additional information on the chemicals present in the body's cells, may also be performed during the MRI exam and may add approximately 15 minutes to the exam time.

What will I experience during and after the procedure?

Most MRI exams are painless.  Some patients, however, find it uncomfortable to remain still during MR imaging. Others experience a sense of being closed-in (claustrophobia). Therefore, sedation can be arranged for those patients who anticipate anxiety, but fewer than one in 20 require it.

It is normal for the area of your body being imaged to feel slightly warm, but if it bothers you, notify the radiologist or technologist. It is important that you remain perfectly still while the images are being recorded, which is typically only a few seconds to a few minutes at a time. For some types of exams, you may be asked to hold your breath. You will know when images are being recorded because you will hear tapping or thumping sounds when the coils that generate the radiofrequency pulses are activated. You will be able to relax between imaging sequences, but will be asked to maintain your position as much as possible.

You will usually be alone in the exam room during the MRI procedure. However, the technologist will be able to see, hear and speak with you at all times using a two-way intercom. Many MRI centers allow a friend or parent to stay in the room as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment.

You may be offered or you may request earplugs to reduce the noise of the MRI scanner, which produces loud thumping and humming noises during imaging. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Some scanners have music to help you pass the time.  When the contrast material is injected, it is normal to feel coolness and a flushing sensation for a minute or two. The intravenous needle may cause you some discomfort when it is inserted and once it is removed, you may experience some bruising. There is also a very small chance of irritation of your skin at the site of the IV tube insertion.

If you have not been sedated, no recovery period is necessary. You may resume your usual activities and normal diet immediately after the exam. A few patients experience side effects from the contrast material, including nausea and local pain. Very rarely, patients are allergic to the contrast material and experience hives, itchy eyes or other reactions. If you experience allergic symptoms, a radiologist or other physician will be available for immediate assistance.

Manufacturers of intravenous contrast indicate mothers should not breast feed their babies for 24–48 hours after contrast medium is given. However, both the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the European Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data suggest that it is safe to continue breast-feeding after receiving intravenous contrast. The Manual on Contrast Media from the ACR states:

"Review of the literature shows no evidence to suggest that oral ingestion by an infant of the tiny amount of gadolinium contrast medium excreted into breast milk would cause toxic effects. We believe, therefore, that the available data suggest that it is safe for the mother and infant to continue breast-feeding after receiving such an agent.

If the mother remains concerned about any potential ill effects, she should be given the opportunity to make an informed decision as to whether to continue or temporarily abstain from breast-feeding after receiving a gadolinium contrast medium. If the mother so desires, she may abstain from breast-feeding for 24 hours with active expression and discarding of breast milk from both breasts during that period. In anticipation of this, she may wish to use a breast pump to obtain milk before the contrast study to feed the infant during the 24-hour period following the examination." 

Who interprets the results and how do I get them?

A radiologist, a physician specifically trained to supervise and interpret radiology examinations, will analyze the images and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the results with you. 

What are the benefits vs. risks?
 

Benefits
 

  • MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that does not involve exposure to ionizing radiation.
  • MR images of the spine are clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of many spinal conditions, including tumors.
  • MRI has proven valuable in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including but not limited to congenital conditions, chronic spinal cord diseases (such as multiple sclerosis), bone abnormalities (e.g., fracture) , disk conditions (e.g., herniated disk), vascular anomalies and tumors.
  • MRI enables the discovery of abnormalities that might be obscured by bone with other imaging methods.
  • The contrast material used in MRI exams is less likely to produce an allergic reaction than the iodine-based materials used for conventional x-rays and CT scanning.
  • MRI demonstrates abnormalities, injuries and diseases in the spinal region that may not be visualized with other imaging methods.
  • MRI is very useful for evaluating spinal injuries It is especially helpful for diagnosing or ruling out acute compression of the spinal cord when clinical examination shows muscle weakness or paralysis.
  • MRI is able to detect subtle changes in the vertebral column that may be an early stage of infection or tumor. The procedure may be better than CT scanning for evaluating tumors, abscesses and other masses near the spinal cord.

Risks
 

  • The MRI examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed.
  • Although the strong magnetic field is not harmful in itself, implanted medical devices that contain metal may malfunction or cause problems during an MRI exam.

What are the limitations of MRI of the Spine?

High-quality images are assured only if you are able to remain perfectly still or hold your breath, if requested to do so, while the images are being recorded. If you are anxious, confused or in severe pain, you may find it difficult to lie still during imaging.  A person who is very large may not fit into the opening of a conventional MRI machine.  The presence of an implant or other metallic object sometimes makes it difficult to obtain clear images and patient movement can have the same effect.

MRI generally is not recommended for patients who have been acutely injured; however, this is a clinical judgment. This is because traction devices and many types of life support equipment must be kept away from the area to be imaged. Furthermore, the examination takes longer than other imaging modalities (typically x-ray and CT) and the results may not be immediately available as is often necessary in trauma situations.  Although there is no reason to believe that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI exam unless medically necessary.

State MRI Price List Updated 9-10-11
Thousands of locations available.
The lowest costs by state are listed below.
Prices may change without notice.
Prices vary by location and facility.
New facilities added daily.
All prices are all inclusive. 
There are no additional charges.

  • Alabama low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $380

  • Arizona low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $360

  • Arkansas low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $510

  • California low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $325

  • Colorado low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $510

  • Connecticut low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $830

  • Delaware low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $755

  • District of Columbia low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $555

  • Florida low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $335

  • Georgia low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $380

  • Illinois low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $380

  • Indiana low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $460

  • Iowa low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $830

  • Kansas low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $510

  • Kentucky low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $435

  • Louisiana low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $430

  • Maryland low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $380

  • Massachusetts low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $580

  • Michigan low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $560

  • Minnesota low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $435

  • Mississippi low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $510

  • Missouri low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $380

  • Montana low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $955

  • Nebraska low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $435

  • Nevada low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $380

  • New Jersey low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $380

  • New Mexico low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $830

  • New York low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $335

  • North Carolina low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $585

  • Ohio low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $380

  • Oklahoma low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $510

  • Oregon low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $485

  • Pennsylvania low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $460

  • Rhode Island low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $680

  • South Carolina low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $510

  • Tennessee low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $435

  • Texas low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $380

  • Utah low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $540

  • Virginia low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $560

  • Washington low cost lumbar, thoracic or cervical spine MRI starting at $380

 

 

 

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Last modified: May 09, 2014

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